Chain Link Fencing: Uses in Residential and Commercial Applications

Chain Link Fencing: Uses in Residential and Commercial Applications

Chain link fences are as fascinating and intricate as chainmail of old. It goes by several other names, such as wire netting, wire mesh fence, chain-wire fence, cyclone fence, hurricane fence, or diamond-mesh fence. It was developed during the height of the industrial revolution by Charles Barnard in 1844 constructed the first wire netting machine, and he based the idea on cloth weaving machines. The galvanized steel mesh of most chain link fences is woven in the same manners as threads are in fabric construction.

Chain link fencing is a handy fencing option because it is both affordable to buy, and cheap to install. And it’s got a variety of uses, both residential as well as commercially.

Residential Uses for Chain Link Fencing

Chain link provides a sizeable amount of home security, while a big slab of solid metal would be harder to get through it isn’t wise to discount chain link fencing just yet. Most home security needs aren’t going to involve very high-risk threats, at least when it comes to “dangerous people.”
Chain link fencing in a residential aspect is more about protecting animals. It’s excellent for corralling smaller animals, such as keeping your dog in the designated yard-area. Chain link fence can even be buried a few inches to a foot below the surface of the ground, making it harder (if not impossible) for him to dig beneath it and escape.

Chain link fencing is also very useful for keeping poultry contained as well since the fence will keep them in a safe and designated area. It can prevent the rabbits from getting into the vegetable garden and foxes out of the chicken coup.

Commercial Uses for Chain Link Fencing

The uses of chain link fencing in the commercial sphere are much broader than in the residential area. It can be used for anything from light security to heavy security, and then shift over completely to things like sports fields.

Chain link can cover a wide range of security options, on the low end, a chain link fence is a convincing “stay away” sign. Fencing can indicate that an area is not a safe place to walk, which is particularly effective for factories or other work-heavy facilities. If more persuasion is needed, adding razor wire to the top for more a more “maximum security” effect is also very common, though that won’t stop someone from cutting through the steel. However, if a criminal attempted that in real life it would give the security team ample time to address the possible intruder and apprehend them before they were able to gain access.

Then, in a more pleasant setting, fences have a broad application in sports fields. The crowd can see-through chain link fencing, which makes it great for stopping potentially renegade balls from attacking a spectator while also not obstructing that spectator’s view of the sport. Most commonly stainless steel fences are used for tennis fields, as well as the backside of baseball fields.

On occasion, this type of fencing will also be used as a “car catcher” on dirt race tracks that slow any runaway race car on its way off the track.

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